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    « Tourists | Main | Sweet Brazil »

    July 25, 2008

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    Corinne

    THANK YOU for introducing me to Gunther!!! How hilarious!!!

    You sound like you are doing just fine. In my opinion, fluency is that holy grail always just out of reach. Most people I know consider me bilingual, but I still don't. I will always feel like I am learning the language and can get better. When I was first learning Portuguese as an exchange student, I was rowing at Flamengo. It gave me Brazilians to talk to every day (instead of isolating myself with the other exchange studnets) and kept me pretty humble (hard to speak Portuguese well when you are out of breath at 6am!). If you can become involved in something everyday or a few times a week (like a sport or similar) with other Brazilians it may help. Of course, the interesting thing about cariocas is how they compartamentalize their lives (beach friends, gym friends, work friends), so don't get discouraged if it takes a while to make friends. It took most of a year before I did something non-rowing related with the people on my team.

    There is an interesting book "How to be a Carioca" that you should be able to find at most bookstores. While it is supposed to just be funny, there is a lot of truth to the chapters, especially how to socialize with cariocas. It is a bit dated (came out in 1993, I think), but an interesting read, nonetheless.

    Julie

    Just want to say that I have been watching a bit of Ciranda de Pedra also, and I just cannot get interested in it. So, don't feel alone there! Oh, and I also watch some television in English with Portuguese subtitles, but I find that I end up reading the Portuguese, rather than listening to the English. Strange.

    Julie

    Just want to say that I have been watching a bit of Ciranda de Pedra also, and I just cannot get interested in it. So, don't feel alone there! Oh, and I also watch some television in English with Portuguese subtitles, but I find that I end up reading the Portuguese, rather than listening to the English. Strange.

    DRL

    Corinne - you are welcome re: Gunther. Just pay it forward... haha! We need to spread the word, maybe someday he can perform at Maracana...
    I hear you on the fluency thing and one of the most interesting things I find about living in Brazil is that you can ask someone if they speak English and they say they don't but soon you realize that the DO! They just don't claim to speak it unless they speak it "perfectly..."

    Julie, thank you for the validation on Ciranda de Pedra! I think it's good to concentrate on reading the Portuguese :)

    Terrie

    So, how do you say, "How do you say" in Portuguese? I'm trying to learn it because I volunteer as an ESL teacher to Brazilians in the US, and the online classes I'm taking have not taught that yet.

    Daily Rio Life

    como voce dize?
    Anyone have a better suggestion?

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